Probiotics For Your Skin: DIY How To Get Them in YOUR skin.
5855
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-5855,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode_grid_1200,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,transparent_content,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-10.1.1

Probiotics For Your Skin: DIY How To Get Them in YOUR skin.

Probiotics For Your Skin
My Continuous Brew Kombucha

‘Probiotics for your skin’ is a hot topic with good reason.

Probotics are necessary mainly for gut flora, but the benefits go far beyond that. You get more from drinking your probotics than taking them in pill form. Kombucha or Kefir are both loaded with probotics. Kombucha has the added benefit of enzymes. If you don’t want to make your own, I highly recommend GT’s Synergy Kombucha (not an affiliate). You can find where it’s sold by clicking here.

Kombucha made by GT’s is the next best thing to making you own

#1: Drink your skin beautiful.

As a true believer of “you are what you eat”; the list below is what drinking kombucha can do for your skin.

  • Works as an anti-inflammatory
  • Improves skin tone
  • Detoxifies skin
  • Brightens skin
  • Hydrates skin
  • Improves texture
  • Brightens skin

#2: DIY yogurt probiotics for your skin mask

Mix the following together well:

Apply to clean skin, sit back and relax for 20 minutes. Rinse with warm water.

#3: DIY SCOBY probiotics for your skin mask

If you don’t make your own kombucha, you can purchase a SCOBY online. Once you buy one, you would create a SCOBY hotel and just peel thin new layers that form on the top of it. But honestly, unless you make kombucha, buying and storing a SCOBY is really stretching it…. it’s easier just to drink it (see probiotics for your skin in the grocery store below). However, making kombucha is FUN so if you’re interested in making your own, I really like Ruthie from Fermentaholics (I’m not an affiliate). Check her out for a plethora of information!

Directions for a SCOBY mask: Peel a thin layer off the top of your SCOBY, apply it to your face, lie down and relax for 20 minutes and then rinse your skin. You can also cut it into pieces so it’s not covering your eyes, nose and mouth. It’s not harmful at all to have it covering those areas, but you’ll be able to breathe and see better! 🙂 Toss the SCOBY you used.

#4: Ferment your veggies – probiotics for your skin and body

Fermenting vegetables is so fast and easy, and SO good for you! Making your own sauerkraut, carrots, green beans, cauliflower… you can ferment any vegetable. In a nutshell, fermented vegetables increase vitamin and enzyme levels of vegetable 2 to 3 times – that’s HUGE and why I ferment mine.

This is an excerpt from Healthy Living Article:  

“Most lacto-fermented foods are made from raw vegetables, without heat. These raw vegetables are allowed to culture over a few days in an anaerobic environment with a salt-water brine, during which the lacto-bacilli grow and culture the food. This type of food preparation is nothing new and has been done since the time of the building of the Great Wall of China. Some of the first original lacto-fermented foods were sauerkraut and pickles.

Lacto-fermented foods have the great benefits of both raw and cooked vegetables. During the lacto-fermenting process the tough cellular walls of vegetables are broken down, allowing for a much easier level of absorption by the body. A plus is that during the lacto-fermentation process the vitamin levels actually increase along with enzyme levels, often by 2 to 3 times.

One last plus that lacto-fermented foods have over raw or cooked vegetables is their pro-biotic count. During the lacto-fermenting process the levels of beneficial pro-biotics can climb to easily pass the numbers of any pro-biotic supplement. These great lacto-bacilli help to build the flora (good bacteria) in the digestive tract, which in turn builds and supports the immune system. Our ancestors knew this fact and often consumed lacto-fermented foods daily to help maintain their health”.

#5: Probiotics for your skin in the grocery store

Kimchi, saurkraut, kombucha, yogurt, pickles, tempeh, kefir, and miso are just a few of the items that are loaded with probotics that are lining the shelves of grocery stores. Look for them in the refrigerated aisles. Cheers to your health!